22 March 2018

Submission to the Northern Territory Government’s Revenue Discussion Paper

The Northern Territory Government should abolish stamp duties and replace them with a broad-based property tax. This could leave Northern Territorians up to $85 million a year better off, while also helping to improve housing affordability. The Government should also abolish grants and stamp duty concessions for first home-buyers.

22 March 2018

Grattan CEO responds to Judith Sloan

Commentator Judith Sloan criticised Grattan Institute in an article published in The Australian on March 21. Grattan CEO John Daley responded in a Letter to the Editor, published the next day. This is the unedited letter

21 March 2018

Hits and myths in the tax debate

The reporting of federal Labor’s dividend imputation policy and earlier policy debates around negative gearing shows how easy it is to mislead Australians about who loses from tax changes. The full range of tricks used by vested interests and political combatants to scare and confuse was on display. Here’s what you should look out for.

13 March 2018

Rise in protest votes sounds warning bell for major parties

Protest politics is on the rise in Australia. At the 2016 federal election, votes for minor parties hit their highest level since 1949. More than one in four Australians voted for someone other than the Liberals, Nationals, ALP or Greens in the Senate, and more than one in eight did likewise for the House of Representatives.

8 March 2018

RBA research shows that zoning restrictions are driving up housing prices

Zoning and planning rules play an important role in managing the growth of cities and protecting the character of particular neighbourhoods. But as Australia confronts a housing affordability crisis, the question is whether the costs of our planning rules outweigh the benefits.

5 March 2018

How migration affects housing affordability

So much of Australia’s history and success is built on immigration. Migrants have benefited incumbent Australians by raising incomes, increasing innovation, contributing to government budgets, smoothing over population ageing and diversifying our social fabric. But it is also true that immigration is affecting house prices and rents.

5 March 2018

Beware what you wish for Sydney

Two decades ago, then NSW premier Bob Carr famously declared that Sydney was “full”. But more people came anyway. House prices rose. Now, opposition to development is rising again. Unless today’s generation of politicians stares down the NIMBYs, Sydney will repeat the mistakes of the past, and housing affordability will get worse.

4 March 2018

From world’s most liveable city to Australia’s most expensive city?

When it comes to making housing affordable, Melbourne has always done it better than Sydney. Sydney’s geography may be spectacular, but it’s bad for building housing. Ocean to the east, mountains to the west, and the Ku-ring-gai national park to the north limit Sydney’s urban sprawl. Whereas Melbourne can build more – and cheaper – housing on abundant greenfield land closer to the city.

23 February 2018

The conventional wisdom is wrong: building more housing does help low-income earners

The conventional wisdom among many affordable housing advocates is that boosting the supply of market-rent housing won’t help low-income earners. But without more supply for everyone, housing won’t become much more affordable, especially for low-income earners.

9 February 2018

What’s the best way to close the gender gap in retirement incomes?

Australia’s retirement income system is not working for the poorest Australians, who are disproportionately women. The superannuation lobby wants more generous super tax breaks to boost the retirement incomes of women, but this would likely worsen the gender gap.

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