Latest Submissions

22 November 2018

The implications of removing refundable franking credits

Federal Labor’s plan to remove refunds for excess franking credits is a fair way to help improve the budget and wind back the growing intergenerational transfers in Australia’s tax system. But there is a better way.

6 September 2018

Australia is well placed to benefit from the widespread uptake of electric vehicles

Electric vehicles offer substantial environmental, social and economic benefits for Australia, and policy makers should do more to encourage their widespread use. In this submission, Grattan’s Tony Wood calls on the COAG Energy Council to support their efficient adoption.

31 July 2018

Good medical practice needs to be founded on patients’ rights

The draft Code of Conduct issued by the Medical Board of Australia, Good medical practice: A Code of Conduct for doctors in Australia, is deficient. It is silent in several areas where it should not be. In this submission, Grattan’s Stephen Duckett identifies ways to strengthen the code so that patients’ rights come first.

26 July 2018

Why Australia should have a tax on sugar sweetened beverages

A tax on sugar sweetened beverages has been offered as one solution to Australia’s increasing obesity problem. While it won’t ‘fix obesity’ on its own, it will likely slow the current growth in rates of obesity, as well as help recover some of the cost to taxpayers.

24 July 2018

Queensland needs to cut pharmacy red tape

The current legislation governing pharmacy ownership in Queensland is more effective in protecting the commercial interests of pharmacy owners than in serving the public interest. Improvements should be made to ensure cost-efficient, high-quality care is available to all consumers.

23 July 2018

The Government’s draft super Bill will make retirees better off

In this submission Grattan CEO John Daley and Australian Perspectives Fellow Brendan Coates argue that the Government’s draft Protecting Our Super Bill will substantially reduce the costs of superannuation, resulting in higher superannuation balances at retirement for many Australians. The Bill promises to curb egregious fees charged on inactive accounts and default insurance offered to those that don’t need it. And it may increase competition between superannuation providers a little, lowering superannuation fees.

4 June 2018

Are the proposed personal income tax cuts affordable and fair?

The Turnbull Government’s planned personal income tax cuts are the largest ever proposed in a federal budget. As Grattan’s Danielle Wood, John Daley and Hugh Parsonage write in this submission, the substantial reduction in revenue is not obviously consistent with the Government’s medium-term fiscal strategy of budget surpluses on average over the economic cycle.

3 May 2018

The nuanced story of regional inequality in Australia

The idea that regional Australia has been ‘left behind’ by the big cities is widespread, and politically potent. There is some truth to the sentiment, but it’s important to recognise the nuance behind the concern, write Grattan Institute’s Danielle Wood, John Daley and Carmela Chivers in this submission to a Senate committee inquiry.

4 April 2018

Submission on Redevelopment and Audit of the Higher Education Data Collection

The federal Department of Education and Training is looking to improve the quality and relevance of higher education student statistics. In this submission to the department’s discussion paper, Grattan’s Andrew Norton and Ittima Cherastidtham call on the Government to establish a universal identifier for post-secondary students.

22 March 2018

Submission to the Northern Territory Government’s Revenue Discussion Paper

The Northern Territory Government should abolish stamp duties and replace them with a broad-based property tax. This could leave Northern Territorians up to $85 million a year better off, while also helping to improve housing affordability. The Government should also abolish grants and stamp duty concessions for first home-buyers.