16 April 2019

Commonwealth Orange Book 2019: Policy priorities for the federal government

The winner of the 2019 federal election should defy the national mood of reform fatigue and stare down vested interests to pursue a targeted agenda to improve the lives of Australians. The Orange Book charts the policy priorities.

28 October 2018

State Orange Book 2018: Policy priorities for states and territories

State and territory governments can do more to improve the lives of Australians. In many cases, states are different because their governments adopted better policies. Every state should learn from the others and do better.

29 July 2018

Mapping primary care in Australia

Primary care policy needs an overhaul to ensure all Australians, especially the poor and the elderly, get the best possible health care. Many poorer Australians can’t afford to go to a GP when they need to or a dentist when they should, and people in rural and remote areas find it too hard to get to a pharmacist or medical specialist.

1 May 2017

Building better foundations for primary care

Simple reforms to Australia’s health system could help save more than $320 million a year on avoidable hospital admissions and provide better care for people with diabetes, asthma, heart disease and other chronic conditions.

14 June 2016

Orange Book 2016: priorities for the next Commonwealth Government

Australia faces many domestic policy challenges as the election looms. Yet a survey of seven years of Grattan Institute reports and policy proposals shows that a government prepared to forcefully articulate the public interest could win public support for a brave and powerful reform agenda.

6 March 2016

Chronic failure in primary care

The Government spends more than $1 billion every year to encourage better prevention and management of chronic disease, but our health system is still failing patients. The way we fund and organise primary care needs to change.

29 September 2013

Access all areas: new solutions for GP shortages in rural Australia

More than a million Australians in rural and remote areas lack access to basic medical care. The solution is relatively simple and cheap, if policymakers adopt new responses to an old problem.