16 April 2019

Commonwealth Orange Book 2019: Policy priorities for the federal government

The winner of the 2019 federal election should defy the national mood of reform fatigue and stare down vested interests to pursue a targeted agenda to improve the lives of Australians. The Orange Book charts the policy priorities.

28 October 2018

State Orange Book 2018: Policy priorities for states and territories

State and territory governments can do more to improve the lives of Australians. In many cases, states are different because their governments adopted better policies. Every state should learn from the others and do better.

22 October 2018

Measuring student progress: A state-by-state report card

Our new report card on NAPLAN results reveals big differences between the states on students’ learning progress through school. Governments should investigate why students make more progress in some states, to identify teacher practices and school policies that produce the best results.

26 November 2017

Towards an adaptive education system in Australia

Australia’s school education system is not fit for purpose, and we need to rethink the way we teach students, support teachers and run schools. To halt the decline, we should make the system more adaptive.

14 June 2016

Orange Book 2016: priorities for the next Commonwealth Government

Australia faces many domestic policy challenges as the election looms. Yet a survey of seven years of Grattan Institute reports and policy proposals shows that a government prepared to forcefully articulate the public interest could win public support for a brave and powerful reform agenda.

21 March 2016

Widening gaps: what NAPLAN tells us about student progress

Learning gaps between Australian students of different backgrounds are too wide, and grow wider as students move through school.

26 July 2015

Targeted teaching: how better use of data can improve student learning

School systems must give teachers the time, tools and training to collect the best evidence about what students need to learn next and use it as the basis of their teaching.

27 January 2010

Measuring what matters: student progress

A large proportion of Australian students only reach minimum standards of literacy and numeracy. These students are spread throughout education systems; few schools do not have poor performing students who would benefit from improved education. After decades of rising expenditure, student performance has stagnated. We have a moral imperative to improve the performance of the 30% of year 9 students who have achieved only the very basic elements of writing literacy.