17 April 2019

Federal Election 2019: Big ideas for Australia’s next government

Event podcast: In this Policy Pitch event at State Library Victoria, Grattan Institute’s tax, energy, health, housing, retirement incomes, and transport & cities experts considered the issues in their field and nominate the choices that would really make a difference to Australia’s future. The discussion drew on Grattan’s Commonwealth Orange Book 2019, which identifies policy priorities for the next government.

17 April 2019

Commonwealth Orange Book 2019: Policy priorities for the federal government

A comprehensive conversation with the contributors to the Grattan Commonwealth Orange Book 2019 breaking down the key policy priorities for the next federal government. Drawing on 10 years of Grattan research and reports, the Orange Book recommends that Australia’s next federal government should defy the national mood of reform fatigue and stare down vested interests to pursue a targeted agenda to improve the lives of Australians.

13 November 2018

State Orange Book 2018: Policy priorities for states and territories – Melbourne

Event podcast: Following the release of our State Orange Book 2018, this Policy Pitch event, featuring a number of Grattan Institute Fellows and Program Directors, examined some of the policy recommendations from ten years of Grattan Institute reports and outline what state and territory governments should do to improve Australia

31 October 2018

South-East Queensland in a time of change – Brisbane

Event podcast: At this State of Affairs event Marion Terrill from the Grattan Institute, Matt Collins, who’s leading the Queensland Government’s Cities Transformation Taskforce, and moderator Steve Abson, who is Chief Executive of the Infrastructure Association of Queensland explored the state of Queensland’s cities and where to from here.

30 October 2018

State Orange Book 2018: Policy priorities for states and territories

A conversation with the contributors to the Grattan State Orange Book 2018. State and territory governments can do more to improve the lives of Australians. In many cases, states are different because their governments adopted better policies. Every state should learn from the others and do better.

9 October 2018

Melbourne in a time of change

Event podcast: Marion Terrill from the Grattan Institute, Peter Mares, a journalist and migration expert who’s just published a book on housing policy, and Miriam Slattery, who heads Strategy and Partnerships at the City of Melbourne and is a transport enthusiast, explored the state of Melbourne and where to from here at this Policy Pitch event.

1 October 2018

Remarkably adaptive: Australian cities in a time of growth

A conversation with Transport Fellow, Hugh Batrouney. Australia’s urban commuters have little to fear from population growth, if recent experience is any guide. The average commute distances and times barely increased over the five years to 2016, even as Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane’s populations grew strongly.

12 July 2018

Getting transport infrastructure projects right

A conversation with Transport Fellow, Hugh Batrouney. Australia is growing – and most of the growth is happening in the capital cities. So are we building enough infrastructure to cope? Are we building the right infrastructure? And are we making the best use of the infrastructure we already have?

27 February 2018

Congestion in Melbourne: is it time to consider congestion charging?

Event podcast: in this Policy Pitch event, a panel of transport and infrastructure experts explored: How bad congestion is across Melbourne; at what point we should consider new strategies to manage congestion, including congestion pricing; and, if a government were to introduce congestion charging, what principles should guide the scheme.

17 October 2017

Stuck in traffic? Road congestion in Sydney

Event podcast: In this Forward Thinking event, an expert panel considered: if we can manage Sydney congestion by working our existing approaches harder or has the city reached a tipping point, where a new approach is needed and if Sydney adopted a different approach, what could it do to keep the city moving?